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Moe v. Butte-Silver Bow County

Moe v. Butte-Silver Bow County, 2016 MT 103 (May 10, 2016) (Baker, J.) (5-0, aff’d)

Issue: (1) Whether the district court properly granted partial summary judgment to the county on Moe’s claim that it violated Montana’s open meeting laws; (2) whether the district court properly granted partial summary judgment to the county on Moe’s claim that it violated Montana’s public participation laws; (3) whether the district court properly granted partial summary judgment to the county on Moe’s § 1983 claim; (4) whether the district court erred in holding as a matter of law that the county did not discharge Moe in violation of its own policies or for refusing to violate public policy; and (5) whether the district court erred in holding that Moe is entitled to a trial on her claim that the county terminated her employment without good cause.…

Citizens for Open Government, Inc. v. City of Polson

Citizens for Open Government, Inc. v. City of Polson, 2015 MT 55 (Feb. 24, 2015) (Baker, J.) (5-0, aff’d)

Issue: (1) Whether citizens’ group was denied its right under Montana’s open meeting laws to participate in an executive session of the City Commission; (2) whether the district court abused its discretion by declining to void the city’s decision to present an offer letter to a city manager candidate; and (3) whether the district court properly determined facts in a summary judgment proceeding without an evidentiary hearing on the merits.

Short Answer: (1) Yes; (2) no; and (3) yes, as there were no genuine disputes of material fact.

Affirmed

Facts: The city of Polson began the process of hiring a new city manager in the spring of 2013.…

Allen v. Lakeside Neighborhood Planning Committee

Allen v. Lakeside Neighborhood Planning Committee, 2013 MT 237 (Aug. 20. 2013) (5-0) (Cotter, J.)

Issue: (1) Whether the district court erred when it declined to void the 2010 Lakeside Neighborhood Plan and determined that Plaintiffs could obtain no relief on their claims for violations of Montana’s open meeting laws; and (2) whether the district court erred in determining that a public meeting could not be held via a Yahoo email group.

Short Answer: (1) No, and (2) no.

Affirmed